A Letter From Verity

 

A LETTER FROM VERITY

In Winston Graham’s 1953 novel, “WARLEGGAN: A NOVEL OF CORNWALL, 1792-1793”, Verity Poldark Blamey had attended the wedding of her widowed sister-in-law, Elizabeth Chynoweth Poldark, to banker, George Warleggan. 

Since the novel’s protagonist Ross Poldark and his wife Demelza Carne Poldark did not attend the wedding, Verity wrote a letter to her cousin-in-law. Below is a passage from that letter:

“I hope Ross is prospering. I need hardly be told the effect Elizabeth’s marriage to George Warleggan will have had on him, and now that they are coming to live beside you it will be an added Offence. Pray be patient with Ross at this time. I have not seen Elizabeth since the day of the wedding, but have had one letter from her. We went, of course, to the wedding, Andrew and I; for Elizabeth’s sake we could not well refuse; she had Few enough of her own people about her. From the start I do not think I liked greatly the thought of this Union. I have no feud such as Ross has to support me, and I have nothing against the Warleggans because they are new rich. Most of our aristocratic families were founded by successful traders at one time or another. But George has never quite carried his money Rightly. None of them do, and when you see them in Aggregate, it is specially noticeable.

Four years earlier, Verity had married a middle-class sea captain named Andrew Blamey. Despite her marriage, despite her declaration that she had nothing against the Warleggan family because they were noveau riche, despite her revelation that many aristocratic families had originated as successful traders and the fact that she was writing to her cousin-in-law, who had been born into the working-class . . . I now realize that Verity was a snob . . . despite all of the above. How disappointing. And yet, I am not surprised. I see that in some ways, she is a lot like her cousin Ross Poldark.

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